The Fox Wood

Sep 14

Fennec Fox

Fennec Fox

(Source: endmypistanthrophobia)

Sep 12

“No thief, however skillful, can rob one of knowledge, and that is why knowledge is the best and safest treasure to acquire.” — ― L. Frank Baum, The Lost Princess of Oz

Sep 07

magicalnaturetour:

«Old Acquaintance” by Sasha :)

He’s rather dignified, don’t you think?

magicalnaturetour:

«Old Acquaintance” by Sasha :)

He’s rather dignified, don’t you think?

Sep 05

“I think you are wrong to want a heart. It makes most people unhappy. If you only knew it, you are in luck not to have a heart.” — L. Frank BaumThe Wonderful Wizard of Oz

Aug 31

A ball of arctic fox.

A ball of arctic fox.

(via zillahletty-deactivated20120814)

Aug 29

“If you take myth and folklore, and these things that speak in symbols, they can be interpreted in so many ways that although the actual image is clear enough, the interpretation is infinitely blurred, a sort of enormous rainbow of every possible colour you could imagine.” —

Diana Wynne Jones

Aug 24

Mama fox love.

Mama fox love.

(via all5park-deactivated20120901)

Aug 23

[video]

Aug 22

“Some parents fear that their children may get carried away by their fantasies; that when exposed to fairy tales, they will come to believe in magic. But every child believes in magic, and he stops doing so when he grows up (with the exception of those who have been too disappointed in reality to be able to trust its rewards).” —


The Uses of Enchantment: The Meaning and Importance of Fairy Tales
 by Bruno Bettelheim

Aug 21

Koschei the Deathless from Marya Morevna 1900

Ivan Bilibin was born in a suburb of St. Petersburg. He studied in 1898 at Anton Ažbe Art School in Munich, then under Ilya Repin in St. Peterburg. In 1902-1904 Bilibin travelled in the Russian North, where he became fascinated with old wooden architecture and Russian folklore. He published his findings in the monograph Folk Arts of the Russian North in 1904. Another influence on his art wastraditional Japanese prints.
Bilibin gained renown in 1899, when he released his illustrations of Russian fairy tales. During the Russian Revolution of 1905, he drew revolutionary cartoons. He was the designer for the 1909 première production of Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov's The Golden Cockerel. The October Revolution, however, proved alien to him. After brief stints in Cairo and Alexandria, he settled in Paris in 1925. There he took to decorating private mansions and Orthodox churches. He still longed for his homeland and, after decorating the Soviet Embassy in 1936, he returned to Soviet Russia. He delivered lectures in the Soviet Academy of Arts until 1941. Bilibin died during the Siege of Leningrad.

Koschei the Deathless from Marya Morevna 1900

Ivan Bilibin was born in a suburb of St. Petersburg. He studied in 1898 at Anton Ažbe Art School in Munich, then under Ilya Repin in St. Peterburg. In 1902-1904 Bilibin travelled in the Russian North, where he became fascinated with old wooden architecture and Russian folklore. He published his findings in the monograph Folk Arts of the Russian North in 1904. Another influence on his art wastraditional Japanese prints.

Bilibin gained renown in 1899, when he released his illustrations of Russian fairy tales. During the Russian Revolution of 1905, he drew revolutionary cartoons. He was the designer for the 1909 première production of Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov's The Golden Cockerel. The October Revolution, however, proved alien to him. After brief stints in Cairo and Alexandria, he settled in Paris in 1925. There he took to decorating private mansions and Orthodox churches. He still longed for his homeland and, after decorating the Soviet Embassy in 1936, he returned to Soviet Russia. He delivered lectures in the Soviet Academy of Arts until 1941. Bilibin died during the Siege of Leningrad.